Kiko Goat Breed Standards

Explanation of Kiko Breed Standards

The goal of the CMGA Kiko Breed Standards is to improve the breed and to increase productivity by identifying what the Kiko committee of the Association has deemed the ideal Canadian Kiko Goat. In recognizing the correlation between physical traits and efficient production, the Standards of this maternal breed provide a guideline for producers to follow when selecting breeding stock and herd replacements.

General Appearance

The Kiko goat is a medium- to large-framed, hardy, vigorous and alert meat animal with high fertility, prolificacy, and high mothering abilities in order to raise multiple kids with high daily gain on natural conditions without supplementation. It is important that bucks be obviously masculine and substantially larger than does. Does should display femininity with a wedge-shaped body showing lots of capacity for carrying young. The dominant coat color for the Kiko goat is white, but any other color patterns are accepted. The coat can vary, according to environment, from short and smooth to quite thick. Kikos have a smooth, supple skin with a darker pigment preferred; however, lack of pigmentation is permissible. Wattles, if present, should not be penalized.

Undesirable Characteristics:

  • A doe or buck which gives the impression of being of the opposite sex
  • Extremely long legs

Head and Neck

The Kiko goat has alert eyes and a strong head with a straight profile, neither convex nor concave. Females must have a feminine head. Ears are alert and moderate in length, not being too pendulous nor too erect. The muzzle is broad with large, open nostrils; the jaw should be correctly aligned. Horns are well-spaced and sweep outward; older animals with cropped horns should not be penalized. Horns on mature bucks should display a shallow spiral. The neck is proportional to body size and medium in length. It is well-muscled and blends smoothly into the forequarter.

Undesirable Characteristics:

  • Concave or convex profile
  • Horns set too closely together
  • Horns too straight
  • Horns swept back too tightly, touching the neck
  • Neck too long, too thin, or too short

Cull Defects:

  • Roman nose
  • Misalignment of jaws: overshot or undershot more than 5mm
  • Crooked face (wry face)
  • Disfiguring malocclusion (very crooked teeth)
  • Total blindness

Forequarters

Shoulders are well-muscled and tightly attached with good angulation. Brisket is broad and proportionate to body size. Forelegs are strong and attach to elbows with good angulation. When viewed from the front, forelegs are parallel and squarely set. Pasterns are strong with sound, well-formed hooves.

Undesirable Characteristics:

  • Toes pointed in or out
  • Weak pasterns
  • Shoulders too loose

Cull Defects:

  • Lameness
  • Any hoof abnormalities that affect the animal’s movement

Body

Body is long, wide and deep with long, well-sprung foreribs and a large heartgirth. The back is strong and straight with a long, wide and well-muscled loin. Body must have sufficient capacity to allow for the ingestion of a maximum of forage with minimal supplementation.

Undesirable Characteristics:

  • Slab-sided body
  • Back extremely short

Hindquarters

Rump is long and broad with a slight slope downward from hips to pins and the tail is straight. Thighs have sufficient, but not excessive, muscle down to the hock; muscle should not be too predominant to avoid kidding problems. Hocks are correctly angulated when viewed from the side; legs are parallel and nearly straight when viewed from the rear. Pasterns are strong with sound, well-formed hooves.

Undesirable Characteristics:

  • Rump too short or steep
  • Thighs with too much muscling
  • Poor angulation in the hocks
  • Sickle hocked
  • Cow hocked
  • Weak pasterns

Cull Defects:

  • Lameness
  • Any hoof abnormalities that affect the animal’s movement

Mammary / Reproductive System

Doe’s udder is medium size and must be well attached with very good capacity for milk production; udder has two well-defined, well-placed, small- to medium-sized functional teats. Small non-functional teats without orifices are permissible if they are supernumeraries (a third teat for example). Buck’s scrotum should not be divided and should contain two well-formed fully descended testicles of similar size. Bucks must be aggressive breeders with high fertility, females must be very fertile and give birth to multiple kids. Kidding should be easy and fast to ensure a high rate of survival in kids.

Undesirable Characteristics:

  • Poorly attached udder
  • More than two functional teats
  • Teats too large
  • Divided scrotum
  • Small testicles

Cull Defects:

  • Hermaphroditism (displaying characteristics of the opposite gender)
  • Bucks with only one testicle or abnormal testicles
  • Completely divided scrotum